take

(1) To agree to buy. A dealer or customer who agrees to buy at another dealer's offered price is said to take the offer. Bloomberg Financial Dictionary
(2) Euro bankers speak of taking deposits rather than buying money. Bloomberg Financial Dictionary

* * *

I. take take 1 [teɪk] noun [countable usually singular] informal
1. FINANCE the amount of money earned by a business in a particular period of time:

• About 80% of the band's take is from merchandise.

the amount of money a government or local authority receives from taxes:

• Cities that experience a big drop in population can suffer as the tax take shrinks.

2. be on the take to be willing to do something wrong or illegal in return for money:

• I knew he was on the take, but I never had enough evidence to prove it.

  [m0] II. take take 2 verb took PASTTENSE [tʊk] taken PASTPART [ˈteɪkən] [transitive]
1. also take away to subtract one number from another number:
take something from something

• Take three from nine and what do you get?

2. also take in COMMERCE if a business takes or takes in a particular amount of money, it earns that money from selling its goods and services:

• We usually take around £2000 on a Saturday.

take something → in phrasal verb [transitive] COMMERCE
if a price or cost takes something in, it includes it:

• This price takes in the cost of all accommodation and food.

take off phrasal verb
1. [transitive] take something → off to have a holiday from work on a particular day, or for a particular length of time:

• I'm taking Thursday off to do some Christmas shopping.

2. [intransitive] to start being successful:

• I hear the business is really taking off.

— see also takeoff
take on phrasal verb [transitive]
1. take somebody → on HUMAN RESOURCES to start to employ someone:

• We're taking on 50 new staff this year.

2. take something → on to agree to do some work or to be responsible for something:

• Gibson is taking on the post of vice president.

take something → out phrasal verb [transitive]
to arrange to get something officially, especially from an insurance company or a court of law:

• I'm thinking of taking out a life insurance policy.

• If discounting took place without the publishers' permission, they would take out an injunction (= ask a court of law to give an order ) to prevent it.

take over something phrasal verb [intransitive, transitive]
1. to take control of something:

• Who will take over when the managing director resigns?

• The drug companies take over the research for the clinical trials.

2. FINANCE to take control of a company by buying more than 50% of its shares:

• A consortium of new companies took over the company a year ago.

• It is a family business and it would lose something if it was taken over by a big conglomerate.

— see also takeover
take something → up phrasal verb [transitive]
1. to start a new job or have a new responsibility:

• He is leaving to take up a position in the private sector.

2. to do something about an idea or suggestion that you have been considering:

• I'm going to take this matter up with my lawyer.

3. to use a particular amount of space or time:

• Computer equipment takes up about a quarter of the office space.

• This problem is taking up too much of my time.

take somebody up on something phrasal verb [transitive]
to accept an offer or invitation that someone has made:

• 2000 managers took up the company's offer of voluntary retirement.

* * *

Ⅰ.
take UK US /teɪk/ verb [T] (took, taken)
(also take away) to subtract one number or amount from another: take sth from sth »

You'll need to take $2,000 from the $8,000 to allow for tax.

to remove something or someone from somewhere: take sth/sb off (sth) »

What are we left with after we take off our costs?

»

I asked for her name to be taken off the list.

»

They decided to take him off the job and assign him to another department.

take sth away »

The police took away all of the files for investigation.

to accept or receive something: »

Do you take credit cards?

take an order »

We're taking 5,000 orders a day.

»

Top executives will take a 10% pay cut.

»

He took a job as salesman in a local company.

»

Are you going to take the job if you get offered it?

(US also take in) COMMERCE to receive money from sales or as payment for something: »

They took an astonishing $100,000 in their first week.

»

The company will make money by taking 5% from each bet.

COMMERCE to buy or choose something: »

The good news is that they have decided to take 200 units a year.

»

50% of our total production is taken by just three customers.

to need something: »

It takes determination to succeed in a new business venture.

if something takes a particular amount of time, that time is needed in order to finish it: »

They estimated that the project would take about 6 months to complete.

have (got) what it takes — Cf. have what it takes
take it or leave it — Cf. take it or leave it
take part (in sth) — Cf. take part in sth
take stock — Cf. take stock
take time — Cf. take time
Ⅱ.
take UK US /teɪk/ noun
[U] FINANCE, COMMERCE money that is received from sales or as payment for something: »

The players now get 75% of the take.

»

Tour operators had come to rely on the commission from insurance to increase their take.

»

Last weekend's take was down over 50%.

be on the take — Cf. be on the take

Financial and business terms. 2012.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Take — Take, v. t. [imp. {Took} (t[oo^]k); p. p. {Taken} (t[=a]k n); p. pr. & vb. n. {Taking}.] [Icel. taka; akin to Sw. taga, Dan. tage, Goth. t[=e]kan to touch; of uncertain origin.] 1. In an active sense; To lay hold of; to seize with the hands, or… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • take — [tāk] vt. took, taken, taking [ME taken < OE tacan < ON taka < ? IE base * dēg , to lay hold of] I to get possession of by force or skill; seize, grasp, catch, capture, win, etc. 1. to get by conquering; capture; seize 2. to trap, snare …   English World dictionary

  • take — ► VERB (past took; past part. taken) 1) lay hold of with one s hands; reach for and hold. 2) occupy (a place or position). 3) capture or gain possession of by force. 4) carry or bring with one; convey. 5) remove from a place. 6) …   English terms dictionary

  • take — [n] profit booty*, catch, catching, cut, gate, haul*, holding, part, proceeds, receipts, return, returns, revenue, share, takings, yield; concept 344 Ant. debt, loss take [v1] get; help oneself to abduct, accept, acquire, arrest, attain, capture …   New thesaurus

  • Take — Take, v. i. 1. To take hold; to fix upon anything; to have the natural or intended effect; to accomplish a purpose; as, he was inoculated, but the virus did not take. Shak. [1913 Webster] When flame taketh and openeth, it giveth a noise. Bacon.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • take — vb took, tak·en, tak·ing vt 1 a: to obtain control, custody, or possession of often by assertive or intentional means b: to seize or interfere with the use of (property) by governmental authority; specif: to acquire title to for public use by… …   Law dictionary

  • Take On Me — ist ein Lied und Nummer Eins Hit der norwegischen Popband a ha, welches von ihrem ersten Album Hunting High and Low aus dem Jahr 1985 stammt. Aufgenommen wurde der Titel bereits 1984, jedoch schaffte er es erst mit dem dritten Anlauf zum Nummer… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Take on Me — «Take on Me» Sencillo de a ha del álbum Hunting High and Low Publicación 5 de abril de 1985; 16 de septiembre de 1985 Formato 7 , 12 Grabación 1984 1985 …   Wikipedia Español

  • Take — (engl. „nehmen, Aufnahme“) steht für: Take bzw. Einstellung (Film), eine ungeschnittene, zumeist kurze Filmaufnahme Take (Musik), die schrittweise Aufnahme von akustischen Signalen Take 2 Interactive, der Hersteller von Computer und Videospielen… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Take 2 — Take Two Interactive Software Inc. Unternehmensform Aktiengesellschaft ISIN …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Take — 〈[ tɛık] m. 6 oder n. 15〉 1. 〈Film〉 1.1 zur Schleife geklebtes Tonfilmband mit einer Szene, das bei der Synchronisation immer wieder abläuft, bis die Übersetzung „lippengenau“ ist 1.2 Einstellung, kurze Szene 2. 〈Mus.〉 Musikstück od. Teil eines… …   Universal-Lexikon

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